Initial Credit Course Options

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Each course covers a semester of content and earns 0.5 credit. Initial credit courses must be completed by August 1, 2019. Online/remote course options will not be continued for initial credit at Olympia & Capital High Schools.

  • $150 per 0.5 credit.
  • Discounts available for current OSD students who qualify for free or reduced meal prices.

 


 

Courses Available for Current High School Students

Graduation and/or Elective Credit

 

Social Studies

 

U.S. Government/Civics

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing

Psychology

This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

Sociology

Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.

Contemporary World Problems

This semester-long course examines the major issues that have shaped the culture of the United States throughout history to the present. Students explore topics that include human rights, globalization, and environmental issues, and investigate the events and circumstances that have influenced the development of today’s complex policies and international relations, such as cultural changes, migration, economics, social policy, international trade, global policies, and greening the globe. The use of recurring themes allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. The course challenges students to foster and develop critical thinking skills so they can make informed decisions about the important global issues in the 21st century.

Washington State History

This semester-long course examines major events in Washington history, culture, and government. Students investigate the geography of the state, the cultures of its earliest peoples, and the impact of the creation of the Washington Territory. Students then focus on the challenges of statehood, Washington’s role during the Progressive Era and wartime period, and modern developments in the state’s economy and culture. Finally, students explore Washington's state, local, and tribal governments to help promote civic literacy. Throughout the course, themes such as social history, the effects of migration, the principles of a democratic government, and the relationship between humans and their environment are examined to allow students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures in Washington, and among multiple perspectives.



Courses Available for Current & Incoming High School Students

Elective Credit

 

Strategies for Academic Success

Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this course encourages high school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.

Career Explorations (Incoming 9th)

This course prepares incoming high school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skill demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of students.

Career Planning & Development (10th Grade and Up)

High school students explore the working world, gaining the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This relevant and timely course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop the skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. This course includes lessons in which students create a self-assessment profile, a cover letter, and a résumé that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.

Pre-Algebra (Semester 1 or 2)

This full-year course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in numbers and operations, expressions and equations, ratios and proportions, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.

Literacy & Comprehension 1

This course is one of two intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

Literacy & Comprehension 2

Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy & Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Each of these reading intervention courses offers an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

Health

This high-school health offering examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws. This course covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and other sensitive topics.

Physical Education

Exploring fitness topics such as safe exercise and injury prevention, nutrition and weight management, consumer product evaluation, and stress management, this course equips high school students with the skills they need to achieve lifetime fitness. Throughout this one-semester course, students assess individual fitness levels according to the five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Personal fitness assessments & activity logs encourage students to design a fitness program to meet their individual fitness goals.



Course titles and content descriptions listed in this catalog have been derived from the Edgenuity Course Catalog 2019.